Free Graze Box Promo Codes

Graze raspberry and coconut muffin snack
Would you like to get a free box of interesting, tasty snacks in your mailbox?

If so, you should try Graze. It's a snack company that will send you a box of four individually and attractively packaged snacks twice a month. I tried Graze after hearing an ad for it on Spotify and using a promo code to get my first box free. At the end of this post, you'll find a promo code so you can try Graze free, too.

I am a frugal person, and assumed that I would cancel after I got my first box for free, but I liked it so much that I've remained a subscriber. Here's what I like about Graze.

For $6.99 either once a week or once every two weeks (delivery is free), you'll get a box of surprise snacks in your mailbox. You don't have to sign for it and, while you don't get to pick your snacks, the surprise is part of the fun.

However, you can tell Graze what not to send you, so if you have an allergy, are on a diet, or just don't like, say, nuts, you can tell Graze that you don't want to get these items in your snack box.

Speaking of diets, if you're thinking that snack foods like dried fruit and nuts are calorically dense and not the type of food you want to eat a lot of, Graze has a solution for that: You can sign up for the calorie-counter box subscription. With the calorie-counter boxes, you won't get any snacks that exceed 150 calories. Plus, since the snacks are individually packaged, they offer a greater level of portion control.

Why do I like Graze so much even though I could seemingly get the same thing for a fraction of the cost by buying a few bags of dried fruit and nuts at the store?

1. The affordable luxury factor. Yes, $6.99 is a lot to pay for about 4 ounces of snacks. But it's a fun surprise in my mailbox every two weeks for a low price.

2. The uniqueness factor. Graze puts together interesting combinations that I wouldn't think of on my own, like the amaretti drops, raspberry-infused cranberries, almond slices and coconut flakes that make up the raspberry and coconut muffin snack. Even if I could think of this combination on my own, I don't know where, or even if, I can buy amaretti drops at the store.

3. The convenience factor. I can grab one of my Graze snacks on my way out the door if it's been one of those days where I've been so busy that I accidentally skipped a meal. They're also great to take hiking and on the airplane.

If you'd like to try Graze, you can get your first and fifth boxes free if you use the coupon code below. I get a free box if three people use my referral code, and then $1 for each referral thereafter.

Graze Coupon Code / Graze Promo Code: AMYF57G5B

How to borrow money to fix up a house

Kevin Quinn's 1866 home, before restoration
Have you ever been watching an episode of House Hunters where a young couple with a modest homebuying budget finds a fixer upper that's under budget and says they can use the savings to repair the house?

I've always wondered where they get that money from, since they probably barely have enough money for a down payment. Where would they find the cash to fix the hideous kitchen and the outdated bathrooms, or to replace the dingy carpet with gorgeous hardwood floors?

While House Hunters doesn't get into the details of homebuyers' finances, there are home loans available that will help you finance a fixer upper, and I've written about two of them for Interest.com.

Kevin Quinn, owner of Bartlett Home Improvement in Memphis, used one of these loans to fix up a house that was in such bad condition that he was repeatedly urged to tear it down and start over.

But he's a big believer in historic preservation, and wanted to restore a crumbling 1866 house.

The before and after photos you see here show what home renovation loans make possible.
Kevin Quinn's 1866 home, after restoration

If you're interested in buying a fixer upper, too, but don't have enough cash to make both a down payment and all the improvements, you can get the details on how these loans work and how Kevin used a renovation mortgage in my Interest.com article, How to finance a fixer-upper.